Annual Events

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Jan. 1st - Gantan-Sai

We celebrate the New Year by praying for the prosperity of the Imperial Family, the nation, shrine parishioners and society as a whole.

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Jan. 12th - Shoto-Sai

On the 12th of December in the 12th year of Meiji (1879), Inoue Shrine was established by imperial decree, and Masakane Inoue was enshrined as a deity to be worshipped by the general public. In commemoration of this, the 12th day of every month is set as an auspicious day, and a monthly ritual is held. The twelfth day of the New Year is the first monthly festival of the year.

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Feb. 4th - Kinen-Sai

This festival is held to pray for a good harvest, the prosperity of the nation, the safety of the Imperial Family, and the happiness of the people at the beginning of the lunar year.

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Feb. 11th - Kigen-Sai

This is a festival to commemorate the great deeds of Emperor Jinmu, to deepen the consciousness of the Japanese people, to renew our sense of patriotism, and to pray for the development of our national prestige.

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Spring Equinox (March) - Spring Sorei-Sai 

The Ancestral Spirit Festival is a festival of thanksgiving for the life that has been passed from generation to generation through the divine virtue of the gods, for remembering the virtues of our ancestors who protect us, and for praying for the blessings of the spirits.

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Apr. 29th - Heiwa-Sai

This is the ultimate celebration of the ancient Shinto religion, a belief in life based on the scriptures of heaven, earth, and nature, a realization and respect that life is divine, and a prayer for the prosperity and revitalization of one's own life.

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Jun. 30 - Nagoshi-no-Oharai

Nagoshi-no-Oharai is said to be the god of water. On the day of the event, a reed boat is built in the Water Hall, where sacred water springs forth, and dolls, entrusted with impurities, are placed in the boat for purification. Then, in the precincts of the shrine, a ritual of going through a thatch ring is held to ward off illnesses.

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Aug. 3rd - Rei-Sai Yoimiya (Yatsugatake Takigi Noh)

On the eve of the shrine’s annual festival, a Noh play is performed.

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Aug. 4th - Rei-Sai

To commemorate the birth of the deity Masakane Inoue (August 4, 1858), this is the annual festival day of Misogi Shrine. On the eve of the festival, a Noh play "Yatsugatake Takigi Noh" is dedicated to the god.

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Autumn Equinox (September) - Autumn Sorei-Sai

The Ancestral Spirit Festival is a festival of thanksgiving for the life that has been passed from generation to generation through the divine virtue of the gods, for remembering the virtues of our ancestors who protect us, and for praying for the blessings of the spirits.

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Full Moon - The 15th day of the eighth lunar month
Kangetsu-Sai

Japanese people are fond of the moon in autumn, as it is said that, "Spring is for flowers, summer is for the lesser cuckoo, autumn is for the moon, and winter is for snow”. The moon is also an incarnation of the god, Tsukuyomi-no-Mikoto. In this mid-autumn, full-moon festival, we chant the name of the deity and praise his divine virtue.

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Nov. 23rd - Niiname-Sai

This is a ritual of thanksgiving to the gods for the harvest, and is one of the most traditional festivals in Japan.

Dec. 12th - Soritsu Kinen-Sai

On the 12th of December in the 12th year of Meiji (1879), Inoue Shrine was established by imperial decree, and Masakane Inoue was enshrined as a deity to be worshipped by the general public. Therefore, this day is designated as the anniversary of the founding of Misogi Shrine.

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Dec. 31st - Toshi-Koshi-no-Oharai

The purification ceremony is held twice a year, on the 30th day of June and the 31st day of December, at shrines all over Japan.

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